Day Seven – Neist Point

On Day Seven, the group headed out to Neist Point, the westernmost point in Scotland.  That should help you find it on the map! Neist Point was a very picturesque spot.  From the parking lot at the end of the long lane, you can either walk down to the lighthouse or up to the top of the cliffs. Annette and I chose to walk up and across the top of the cliffs. It felt very cold on top of the cliffs.  I think the temperature was probably in the mid-40's F, but the wind was howling!  I'm guessing it was a sustained 30 to 40 mph wind coming off of the water.  What a wind chill! On the top of the cliff there was an abandoned brick and concrete building.  It was small, probably less than 10' square.  The front and the front half of the sides were open.  It looked like an observation post to me.  If I had to guess, it was probably from WWI or WWII.  It was fun to try and figure out what the building was used for and how each of the features of the building were used. Now that I am home, I looked for the building in the satellite view on the online maps.  I found the building and I found what appears to be some rectangular indentations in the ground behind the building.  That gets my imagination fired up!  What was this place? But that's not where the beauty was on that day.  The beauty was in the land, the sea and the sunlight! Woody's Scotland-9749 This image was taken as we first arrived.  You can see how the lighting was still fairly even. Woody's Scotland-9851 As the sun got lower, it was partially hidden by the clouds and this beautiful mottled light on the ground was the result. Woody's Scotland-9810 It was a long walk down to the lighthouse and a steep climb back out, so I did not attempt to go to the lighthouse. I think the better image of the lighthouse was from up here at the top of the cliffs. Woody's Scotland-9809 In an earlier post about Scotland, I hinted that I didn't like to shoot into the sun, just to get the twinkling glint of the sun on the water.  But, here in this last image, I did it anyway.  I guess that I learned from trial and error during the workshop that if you shoot into the sun, you will likely end up with a silhouette.  That's what I wanted this time, so I took the shot directly into the sun's reflection on the water.